links

She barely knew how to Google, and yet here she was, browsing Wikipedia articles and D&D fansites.

Antoine H. via Twitter

A brilliant story, wonderfully told.

Conversations like this are why I am looking to leave Google once and for all. Jeremy Keith does a great job of keeping the thread on-topic, whilst both Malte Ubl and Paul Bakaus – the Google employees – speak as if they were part of a cult.

My unpopular opinion: it’s a testimony to the Clintons’ extraordinarily hardball political acumen that they’ve been subjected to these fever dream theories for 30 years and go-along-to-get-along Obama never was.

John Gruber

Meanwhile:

I’ve been catching up on the different shows from The Economist, and today listened to the In the sharenthood episode of The world ahead. Thoroughly recommended for people interested in privacy, generational culture, and where those issues meet. 🎙

The more I think about the news vs punditry and expertise, the more I agree with @JohnPhilpin re: the news as commodity. I’m not sure the actual news should be available as a publication on a website; perhaps something limited, or strictly feed-based would be better.

Long form writing on the web is like anything else that has the most value; it might not be the easiest, quickest, or most convenient option, but you will benefit from it the most in the long run.

Look at Seth Godin, for instance, and combine 7 of his posts. That’s long form.

In my 22 years of doing visits with children in detention, I have never heard of this level of inhumanity.

Holly Cooper, co-director of University of California, Davis’ Immigration Law Clinic.

Holly is talking about one of the concentration camps.

There are a number of different third-party Micro.blog projects in development. Using Today I Learned (@til), you can find and keep up to date on their progress.

Here’s a starter pack: